Using LINQ ForEach To Populate Generic List in C# AND Enum to List

A C# trick I first had trouble wrapping my head around is using the LINQ ForEach operator to populate a list.  I was originally inspired by some source I found in the EXT.NET Icon building sample.   In addition to the ForEach lamda trick they included a very nice pattern for converting a c# Enum to a List.  So, let’s get right to the code.   enum Days { Sat = 1, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri }; static void Main(string[] args) { List<string> daysOfWeekList = Enum.GetNames(typeof(Days)).ToList(); daysOfWeekList.ForEach(a => Console.WriteLine(a)); }   That’s it!   Just another two patterns of using c# which helps me live cleaner in c#! HTH’s. … Continue Reading

In C# Passing Delegate As Parameter, Then Executing on Return

I did not know that it is possible to have a delegate as a call to a method, then have that method actually execute that delegate at it’s convenience.  I’m busy converting a Xamarin conference application for the IPad and am wrangling getting it to show Silicon Valley Code Camp data rather than MWC (Mobile World Conference data). So, here is the method I ran into: var siteParser = new MWC.SAL.MWCSiteParser(); siteParser.GetConference (Constants.ConferenceDataUrl, () => { var c = siteParser.ConferenceData; if (c == null) { … Continue Reading

Building a Login Screen With Xamarin’s MonoTouch and XCode StoryBoard

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  Part 1 The Video and Introduction (this) Part 2 In Blog Format with words and screen shots     Introduction I’ve been hard at work learning the MonoTouch framework from Xamarin recently.  For those that don’t know, MonoTouch is a framework that runs on top of the Apple XCode development environment that allows you to essentially use the .net framework as your programming language of choice instead of objective C (I hope I got that right).  Since it has been a while since I’ve used C, and I have so much stuff I’ve done in C# I can leverage, this seems like a good fit. I’m about a good solid week of programming into this and I have to admit I’ve gotten pretty … Continue Reading

Deeply Nested Null Checking in C# verses Assert with no nesting

One of the code smells that particularly bothers me (though I often find myself doing it anyhow) is when I defensively program against nulls in C# (though could be any other language).  That is, I do something like the following var rec = getRecord(..); if (rec != null) { var rec1 = getAnotherRecord(..); if (rec1 != null) { rec2 = getAThridRecord(..); if (rec2 != null)... The code gets ugly quick and the nesting does not help the readability, and if anything, hurts it. Today, while using a daily build of Resharper7, I noticed that when I asked resharper to do the null check for me, instead of doing the above, it did the following: var rec = getRecord(..); Debug.Assert(rec != null,"rec != … Continue Reading

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