My Pluralsight ASP.NET Multi-tenant Course in Top 10

Two weeks ago my 4th course on Pluralsight released and for the past few days it has been in the top 10.  If you have not had a chance to look at it, check it out.  I’m particularly proud of the introduction which has flying super hero’s! Check it out the intro here And the full course here. … Continue Reading

Name Collisions with Asp.Net Webapi and How to Avoid

I love the simplicity of using ASP.NET WebAPI for building simple web rest services.  No special calls to create JSON, simple REST conventions implemented with the methods GET,POST,PUT and DELETE and very straight forward interfaces. The thing that annoys me is the naming convention.  In my case, I’ve create a folder /rest on my web server and I put all my WebAPI controllers there.  An example of a controller looks as follows: [crayon-5928fc5ae3394738217289/]   The problems comes up when you decide you want to have a different FAQ controller for different parts of the web site.  The obvious solution is to drop the REST services into sub directories.  Unfortunately, since the class name above does not … Continue Reading

Debugging SendGrid’s Parsing Incoming Messages

SendGrid has a nice feature available to it’s Silver Level Subscribers and above (currently $79/month) that let’s you have incoming message to a domain parsed and forwarded through a web service.  This is great if it works but if it does not debugging is tricky because the web service is running on your production server. Here are some steps to debug the service. Go to the URL:  http://requestb.in/ and then use the URL given to you as the email forwarding URL inside of the SendGrid Control panel. Then, send an email to your domain you want to parse (siliconvalley-codecamp.net in my case). Head back to the requestdb.in page and look at the request. Copy the headers into the fiddler compose request page, then the body … Continue Reading

WebAPI REST Routing For AngularJS and ExtJS

As most of my readers know, I’ve done a lot of work with the JavaScript libraries made by Sencha (ExtJS and SenchaTouch).  The typical JSON sent down to the requesting web application looks like the following with both Sencha products. { "data": [ { "shirtSize": "Mens-4XL", "id": 30 }, { "shirtSize": "Mens-5XL", "id": 31 }, { "shirtSize": "Mens-6XL", "id": 32 } ], "total": 34, "success": true } Notice that it is a single JavaScript object that has a property named data which is the array we are interested in. AngularJS’s Resource api expects just the data array by default without the nice wrapping with total and status.  That is, Angular just … Continue Reading

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